Tuesday, May 16, 2006

ORISSA POLICE HISTORY

History of Orissa Police

April 1 st, 1936 will always remain etched in golden letters in the
history of Orissa, as on this date both the state of Orissa and the Orissa Police were born. The new state was formed by taking some portions of Madras presidency and Central province. The new province constituted of six districts. Perhaps, police administration , in some form or the other, has been in-vogue since the inception of human civilization. In the context of our country, a brief mention about policing is found in “Manu Smruti” codified by Manu, the great law- giver. Kautilya, a great scholar and diplomat of the Mauryan period described the duties and functions of the police in “ARTHA SHASTRA”. In the ancient state of Kalinga “Atabika “ police were being employed to control civic unrest. During those days the police officials were known as “RAKSHIMAAH”.

During the medieval period successive rulers like Ananga Bhim Dev, Pratap Rudra Dev, Mukunda Dev etc., used “DANDA PAIKAS” for policing in their jurisdiction. However, during the Moghul period the police administration was under the charge of ’Kotwal’ whose duty was to maintain order and peace in his jurisdiction.

After Moghuls and Afghans the Marathas ruled over Orissa for about a century. They continued with the system of village police introduced by the Moghuls. However, with the advent of the Britishers a new system of policing was introduced in Orissa from 1803. During the British rule , the land holders and Jamindars were required to appoint and maintain police force within their respective estates. In 1829, the post of Supdt. of Police, was abolished and the office of the Magistrate was transferred from the judge to the Collector. The Magistrate was the controlling officer of the police who were known as Darogas. In fact, Darogas enjoyed absolute powers.

There was widespread discontentment against the police tyranny in 1855 in Madras. In 1857 the Paikas openly revolted against the British rule. As a result of these developments a commission was set up by the House of Commons to enquire into the administration of justice and the police system in India. Based on the recommendations of the Commission the police Act (Act V of 1861) was passed which is the basis for policing till date not only in Orissa but also in most parts of the country.

In 1936 the Orissa Police was formed in sync with formation of the state of Orissa which comprised of 4000 policemen approx. of all ranks taken together. Since the police personnel belonged to three different, heterogeneous police forces namely Bihar – Orissa, Madras presidency and Central provinces, some genuine difficulties were being faced by the police administration in managing the force. Moreover, a good number of policemen returned to Madras and Central provinces which led to dislocation in police work for sometime.

Mr. E.A.O. Perkin was the first I.G. of Police of Orissa Police and Mr. I.C. Mcnally was the first A.I.G. of Police who was also in-charge of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

There were 8 Ss.P in the province out of which six were in charge of six districts and remaining two Ss.P were in-charge of the Railways and the CID.

In 1937, there was a general election in which the Congress party won 36 seats out of 66 assembly seats. Since the Congress was unwilling to form a Govt., an interim Govt., was formed which was headed by the Maharaja of Paralakhemundi. Thus, on 19.7.1937 Orissa Police came under a popular Govt., for the first time. Between 1939 to 1945, due to out break of the world war –II, the police was under great strain due to multifarious activities relating to the war efforts of the Govt. and various agitational activities undertaken by the Congress from time to time. During this period some trained signalmen were sent from the Ganjam armed police to take part in the war though many other officers and men who had volunteered for military service were not allowed to join the armed forces as the Govt., could not afford to weaken the civil administration.

The Orissa Police Manual Rules (PMR) was compiled in 1940 as a hand manual dealing with powers, functions and duties of the police at various levels.

2. On 15 th August,1947 India achieved independence. With the ushering in of independence, the Orissa Police became a people’s police, a significant departure from being a colonial police. Mr. J.E. Pearman became the 1 st Inspector General of Police of the State after the Independence.

In 1948, 25 feudatory states were merged with Orissa, thus increasing the geographical size of the state significantly. With the integration of the princely states in Orissa the number of districts became 11. In 1949, the state of Mayurbhanj was merged into Orissa and it became a district of the southern police range. However, later it was included in the northern range w.e.f. 1.1.1950, for administrative convenience. In Nov’ 1949 the district of Kalahandi consisting of Dhama Nagar sub-division of the then Bolangir district and Nuapada sub- division of Sambalpur district was included in the northern range. Thus , the numbers of districts increased to 13. Of the two ranges the northern range, having its Hqrs. at Sambalpur comprised of Sambalpur, Bolangir, Dhenkanal, Sundargarh, Mayurbhanj, Keonjhar and Kalahandi districts and OMP 2 nd Bn., and Police Training College at Angul. The Southern range with its Hqrs. at Cuttack, comprised of Cuttack, Puri, Balasore, Ganjam, Koraput and Phulbani districts and the OMP 1 st Bn., . The Railway police force remained under the control of D.I.G. Southern range but it was subsequently brought under the D.I.G. CID, w.e.f. 1.3.1950.

After retirement of Mr. Pearman on 31.3.1948 Mr. C.M. Wright Neville became the I.G. of Police. After Mr. Neville, Mr. B.Roy took over charge as I.G. of Police on 19.8.51. After his retirement on 11.10.1958 Sri R.C. Dash took charge of I.G. of Police.

In 1955, the new capital of the state was established at Bhubaneswar.

A new police range was created at Berhampur w.e.f. 1.1.1960.

Sri R.C.Das left the office of I.G.P. on 16.5.1960 and joined as a member of the Orissa Pay Committee. He was succeeded by Sri J.C. Ghosh as I.G. of Police.

After Sri J.C. Ghosh, Sri S.K.Ghosh (29.3.64 to 21.3.67), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (21.3.67 to 24.9.67), Sri J.C.Ghosh IPS, (25,9.67 to 14.1.68) Sri R.K.Padhi (14.1.68 to 14.1.69), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (29.1.69 to 28.2.69), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (22.3.69 to 7.8.69), Shri B.B.Mishra, IPS (7.8.69 to 22.1.73), Shri R.K.Padhi, IPS (22.1.73 to 20.1.74), Shri N.Chand, IPS (20.1.74 to 16.8.74), Shri N.Swain,IPS(16.8.74 to 19.5.77), Shri B.K.Roy,IPS (19.5.77 to 10.7.79), Sri C.S.Padhi, IPS (10.7.79 to 21.4.80), Shri N.Swain, IPS, first DGP,Orissa (21.4.80 to 31.7.83), Shri S.S.Padhi,IPS (31.7.83 to 5.4.85) Sri B.K.Panigrahi,IPS (5.4.85 to 31.8.86) Shri S.S.Padhi,IPS (31.8.86 to 26.8.87), Sri P.C.Ratho,IPS( 26.8.87 to 18.12.89), Shri S.Sinha, IPS (18.12.89 to 22.5.90), Shri D.N.Singh,IPS (22.5.90 to 31.1.91) Sri S.N.Mishra,IPS (31.1.91 to 3.7.91), Shri P.C.Ratho,IPS (3.7.91 to 30.12.92), Shri S.C.Mishra,IPS (30.10.92 to 18.1.94), Shri R.N.Mohapatra,IPS (18.1.94 to 15.11.95), Sri A.B.Tripathy,IPS (16.11.95 to 31.10.97), Dr.B.B.Panda, (31.10.97 to 5.3.99), Shri D.K.Mohapatra,IPS (5.3.99 to 12.10,.99) Dr.B.B.Panda, IPS (12.10.99 to 10.3.2000), Sri S.K.Chatterjee,IPS (10.3.2000 to 30.4.2001), Shri K.D.Bajpai,IPS (30.4.01 to 31.7.01), and Shri N.C.Padhi,IPS (31.7.01 to 31.7.04) became the chiefs of the Orissa Police. After shri Padhi Shri B.B.Mishra,IPS has taken over as D.G. & I.G of Police since 31.7.04 PM..

3. In 1964, after a serious communal riot in Rourkela followed by state-wide students’ agitation, a new police district namely Rourkela was created and a new range namely Western Range consisting of Sundargarh , Keonjhar and Rourkela police districts was carved out of the Northern Range.

For proper intelligence work the post of DIG, Intelligence was created with effect from 14.05.1964 by taking out the special branch from the control of the DIG, CID and Railways.

For better supervision and coordination over the vastly expanded signals establishment in the state, the post of DIG, Technical was created w.e.f. 17.12.1971.

In order to ensure better policing of the state capital a new police district namely Bhubaneswar police district was formed w.e.f. 1.4.1975.

In 1979, a state-wide agitation was launched by the Havildars and Constables of Orissa Police under the leadership of Latifur Rahaman which subsided after a brief turmoil.

In 1981, Cuttack district was divided into two districts viz:- Cuttack Rural and Cuttack Sadar from administrative point of view. In 1984 a new police range namely South-Western range was formed having its Hqrs. at Sunabeda, carving it out of the Southern Range, Berhampur. In the same year a new police district was formed at Berhampur, carving it out of Ganjam district. The following year another range namely Central range, with its Hqrs. at Cuttack, was carved out of the southern range.

In 1992, 4 new districts namely Gajapati, Rayagada, Malkangiri and Nawarangapur were formed Subsequently in 1993, 9 more districts namely Jagatsinghpur, Jajpur, Kendrapara, Nayagarh, Khurda, Bhadrak, Nuapada, Angul and Sonepur were formed. Again in 1994 3 new districts namely Boudh, Jharsuguda and Deogarh were formed.,thus increasing the number of districts to 32. (32 Police districts against 30 Revenue districts) .

  • After enactment of the Orissa Military Police Act (Orissa Act VII of 1946) the Orissa Military Police was formed on 1 st March, 1946. Soon after its creation this force had to handle serious situations in places like Bhadrak, Ib, Barang, Rampur, Cuttack etc. Due to strenuous nature of work of the military police and need for more personnel its strength was increased w.e.f. 1 st March, 1947. The strenth was further increased with the formation of a Gurkha Military Police unit. On 1 st March 1948, after merger of feudatory States in the Province of Orissa,there was a re-organisation of the police organization and the 2 nd Battalion of Orissa Military police was established. This Battalion had both Gurkha and Oriya companies. While the Bn. Headquarters was at Dhenkanal, two detachment camps of this battalion were functioning at Nayagarh and Jharsuguda. Subsequently, other Battalions came up at different places of the State. At present, there are altogether 8 Battalions and one India Reserve Battalion.

The name “Orissa Military Police” remained in vogue till 1980 .consequent upon enactment of the Orissa Military Police (Amendment) Act 1980, the name “Orissa Military Police’’ was changed to “Special Armed Police”. The headquarters of the SAP is at state Police Hqrs, Cuttack and it is under the general control and direction of the Director General and Inspector General of Police.

4. Annual central grant known as “Modernisation grant “ was made available to all the states by the Centre from 1969-70 onwards. Under this scheme Orissa Police received funds to purchase wireless equipments, motor vehicles, scientific and technical equipments etc for modernization of the Orissa Police. A full-fledged forensic science laboratory was established at Bhubaneswar under the control of DIG, CID, providing serological, chemical and other expert- examination facilities within the state.

5. Home-guards organization, as an auxiliary force, was set up in Orissa in the year 1962. In 1973 the post of Deputy Commandant General, Home-guards and Fire Service was sanctioned. However, in 1978 the Fire service and Home guards organization was taken out of the control of Police organization and started functioning independently under the Commandant General, Home-guards and Inspector General, Fire Service under the Home Department. The status of the head of the department was up-graded to the rank of Director General in 1985.

6. Since its inception the Orissa Police has successfully handled major Law and Order situations and ensured safety of its citizen and security of public properties.. In the fourth decade of the twentieth century the colonial police tackled a number of law and order problems arising out of nationalist movements. After the independence in 1947, there was a lull as nationalist movements subsided. However, the state witnessed palpable tension during the visit of the State Re-organisation Committee in 1955. Recommendations of the State Re-organisation Committee generated tension and frustrations resulting in large-scale demonstrations and law and order situations in January, 1956. ‘Sima Andolon’ (Border agitation) in Sareikela and Kharasuan opposing its merger with Bihar spread in different parts of the state with large scale demonstrations taking place at a number of places. In the ensuing law and order situation there was a police firing at Puri in which 3 persons lost their lives. Establishment of Paradeep port in 1956, Hirakud Dam in 1960-61 and Tikarpada Dam in 1962-63 brought in its wake, law and order situations, on issues relating to resettlement of evacuees etc. Another landmark on the law and order scenario was a large-scale communal riot in and around Rourkela in 1964. An students’ agitation gripped the entire state during 1964. Another statewide students’ agitation shook the entire state in 1969. In 1980, a students’ agitation on some local issues started in Sambalpur, which subsequently turned into an agitation against a particular business community and spread in almost all the districts of western Orissa. In 1990, after declaration of acceptance of recommendations of the Mandal Commission by the Central Govt., agitations started in many parts of the country including Orissa. The agitation spread almost in the entire state and police had to use all the resources at its command to contain the same. Police had to resort to firing in Cuttack and use force, though of lesser magnitude, in many other places. In 1991 there was a serious communal riot at Bhadrak in which a number of lives were lost. The riot spread to Soro, another small town located nearby. However, the communal riots were firmly controlled in both the towns. Thereafter, no major law and order situation of state-wide dimension has been witnessed in the state.

7. In the 1980s, left wing extremism raised its hydrahead after a gap of about a decade in certain parts of southern districts of Orissa, namely, Koraput, and Ganjam. After the division of Koraput district into 4 districts viz:- Koraput, Rayagada, Malkanagiri and Nowrangpur district and division of Ganjam district into Ganjam and Gajapati districts, the left wing extremism was noticed taking an ascendance in the districts of Malkangiri, Rayagada, and Gajapati. In later part of 1990s the left wing extremism also spread to the districts of Mayurbhanj, Keonjhar and Sundargarh located in the Northern Orissa.

8. Orissa Police has kept pace with others in modernisation by procuring latest gadgets and arms and ammunition, in building up infrastructure and upgrading the skill of its personnel by providing latest training.

History of Orissa Police

History of Orissa Police


April 1 st, 1936 will always remain etched in golden letters in the history of Orissa, as on this date both the state of Orissa and the Orissa Police were born. The new state was formed by taking some portions of Madras presidency and Central province. The new province constituted of six districts.

Perhaps, police administration , in some form or the other, has been in-vogue since the inception of human civilization. In the context of our country, a brief mention about policing is found in “Manu Smruti” codified by Manu, the great law- giver. Kautilya, a great scholar and diplomat of the Mauryan period described the duties and functions of the police in “ARTHA SHASTRA”. In the ancient state of Kalinga “Atabika “ police were being employed to control civic unrest. During those days the police officials were known as “RAKSHIMAAH”.

During the medieval period successive rulers like Ananga Bhim Dev, Pratap Rudra Dev, Mukunda Dev etc., used “DANDA PAIKAS” for policing in their jurisdiction. However, during the Moghul period the police administration was under the charge of ’Kotwal’ whose duty was to maintain order and peace in his jurisdiction.

After Moghuls and Afghans the Marathas ruled over Orissa for about a century. They continued with the system of village police introduced by the Moghuls. However, with the advent of the Britishers a new system of policing was introduced in Orissa from 1803. During the British rule , the land holders and Jamindars were required to appoint and maintain police force within their respective estates. In 1829, the post of Supdt. of Police, was abolished and the office of the Magistrate was transferred from the judge to the Collector. The Magistrate was the controlling officer of the police who were known as Darogas. In fact, Darogas enjoyed absolute powers.

There was widespread discontentment against the police tyranny in 1855 in Madras. In 1857 the Paikas openly revolted against the British rule. As a result of these developments a commission was set up by the House of Commons to enquire into the administration of justice and the police system in India. Based on the recommendations of the Commission the police Act (Act V of 1861) was passed which is the basis for policing till date not only in Orissa but also in most parts of the country.

In 1936 the Orissa Police was formed in sync with formation of the state of Orissa which comprised of 4000 policemen approx. of all ranks taken together. Since the police personnel belonged to three different, heterogeneous police forces namely Bihar – Orissa, Madras presidency and Central provinces, some genuine difficulties were being faced by the police administration in managing the force. Moreover, a good number of policemen returned to Madras and Central provinces which led to dislocation in police work for sometime.

Mr. E.A.O. Perkin was the first I.G. of Police of Orissa Police and Mr. I.C. Mcnally was the first A.I.G. of Police who was also in-charge of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

There were 8 Ss.P in the province out of which six were in charge of six districts and remaining two Ss.P were in-charge of the Railways and the CID.

In 1937, there was a general election in which the Congress party won 36 seats out of 66 assembly seats. Since the Congress was unwilling to form a Govt., an interim Govt., was formed which was headed by the Maharaja of Paralakhemundi. Thus, on 19.7.1937 Orissa Police came under a popular Govt., for the first time. Between 1939 to 1945, due to out break of the world war –II, the police was under great strain due to multifarious activities relating to the war efforts of the Govt. and various agitational activities undertaken by the Congress from time to time. During this period some trained signalmen were sent from the Ganjam armed police to take part in the war though many other officers and men who had volunteered for military service were not allowed to join the armed forces as the Govt., could not afford to weaken the civil administration.

The Orissa Police Manual Rules (PMR) was compiled in 1940 as a hand manual dealing with powers, functions and duties of the police at various levels.

2. On 15 th August,1947 India achieved independence. With the ushering in of independence, the Orissa Police became a people’s police, a significant departure from being a colonial police. Mr. J.E. Pearman became the 1 st Inspector General of Police of the State after the Independence.

In 1948, 25 feudatory states were merged with Orissa, thus increasing the geographical size of the state significantly. With the integration of the princely states in Orissa the number of districts became 11. In 1949, the state of Mayurbhanj was merged into Orissa and it became a district of the southern police range. However, later it was included in the northern range w.e.f. 1.1.1950, for administrative convenience. In Nov’ 1949 the district of Kalahandi consisting of Dhama Nagar sub-division of the then Bolangir district and Nuapada sub- division of Sambalpur district was included in the northern range. Thus , the numbers of districts increased to 13. Of the two ranges the northern range, having its Hqrs. at Sambalpur comprised of Sambalpur, Bolangir, Dhenkanal, Sundargarh, Mayurbhanj, Keonjhar and Kalahandi districts and OMP 2 nd Bn., and Police Training College at Angul. The Southern range with its Hqrs. at Cuttack, comprised of Cuttack, Puri, Balasore, Ganjam, Koraput and Phulbani districts and the OMP 1 st Bn., . The Railway police force remained under the control of D.I.G. Southern range but it was subsequently brought under the D.I.G. CID, w.e.f. 1.3.1950.

After retirement of Mr. Pearman on 31.3.1948 Mr. C.M. Wright Neville became the I.G. of Police. After Mr. Neville, Mr. B.Roy took over charge as I.G. of Police on 19.8.51. After his retirement on 11.10.1958 Sri R.C. Dash took charge of I.G. of Police.

In 1955, the new capital of the state was established at Bhubaneswar.

A new police range was created at Berhampur w.e.f. 1.1.1960.

Sri R.C.Das left the office of I.G.P. on 16.5.1960 and joined as a member of the Orissa Pay Committee. He was succeeded by Sri J.C. Ghosh as I.G. of Police.

After Sri J.C. Ghosh, Sri S.K.Ghosh (29.3.64 to 21.3.67), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (21.3.67 to 24.9.67), Sri J.C.Ghosh IPS, (25,9.67 to 14.1.68) Sri R.K.Padhi (14.1.68 to 14.1.69), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (29.1.69 to 28.2.69), Sri R.K.Padhi, IP (22.3.69 to 7.8.69), Shri B.B.Mishra, IPS (7.8.69 to 22.1.73), Shri R.K.Padhi, IPS (22.1.73 to 20.1.74), Shri N.Chand, IPS (20.1.74 to 16.8.74), Shri N.Swain,IPS(16.8.74 to 19.5.77), Shri B.K.Roy,IPS (19.5.77 to 10.7.79), Sri C.S.Padhi, IPS (10.7.79 to 21.4.80), Shri N.Swain, IPS, first DGP,Orissa (21.4.80 to 31.7.83), Shri S.S.Padhi,IPS (31.7.83 to 5.4.85) Sri B.K.Panigrahi,IPS (5.4.85 to 31.8.86) Shri S.S.Padhi,IPS (31.8.86 to 26.8.87), Sri P.C.Ratho,IPS( 26.8.87 to 18.12.89), Shri S.Sinha, IPS (18.12.89 to 22.5.90), Shri D.N.Singh,IPS (22.5.90 to 31.1.91) Sri S.N.Mishra,IPS (31.1.91 to 3.7.91), Shri P.C.Ratho,IPS (3.7.91 to 30.12.92), Shri S.C.Mishra,IPS (30.10.92 to 18.1.94), Shri R.N.Mohapatra,IPS (18.1.94 to 15.11.95), Sri A.B.Tripathy,IPS (16.11.95 to 31.10.97), Dr.B.B.Panda, (31.10.97 to 5.3.99), Shri D.K.Mohapatra,IPS (5.3.99 to 12.10,.99) Dr.B.B.Panda, IPS (12.10.99 to 10.3.2000), Sri S.K.Chatterjee,IPS (10.3.2000 to 30.4.2001), Shri K.D.Bajpai,IPS (30.4.01 to 31.7.01), and Shri N.C.Padhi,IPS (31.7.01 to 31.7.04) became the chiefs of the Orissa Police. After shri Padhi Shri B.B.Mishra,IPS has taken over as D.G. & I.G of Police since 31.7.04 PM..

3. In 1964, after a serious communal riot in Rourkela followed by state-wide students’ agitation, a new police district namely Rourkela was created and a new range namely Western Range consisting of Sundargarh , Keonjhar and Rourkela police districts was carved out of the Northern Range.

For proper intelligence work the post of DIG, Intelligence was created with effect from 14.05.1964 by taking out the special branch from the control of the DIG, CID and Railways.

For better supervision and coordination over the vastly expanded signals establishment in the state, the post of DIG, Technical was created w.e.f. 17.12.1971.

In order to ensure better policing of the state capital a new police district namely Bhubaneswar police district was formed w.e.f. 1.4.1975.

In 1979, a state-wide agitation was launched by the Havildars and Constables of Orissa Police under the leadership of Latifur Rahaman which subsided after a brief turmoil.

In 1981, Cuttack district was divided into two districts viz:- Cuttack Rural and Cuttack Sadar from administrative point of view. In 1984 a new police range namely South-Western range was formed having its Hqrs. at Sunabeda, carving it out of the Southern Range, Berhampur. In the same year a new police district was formed at Berhampur, carving it out of Ganjam district. The following year another range namely Central range, with its Hqrs. at Cuttack, was carved out of the southern range.

In 1992, 4 new districts namely Gajapati, Rayagada, Malkangiri and Nawarangapur were formed Subsequently in 1993, 9 more districts namely Jagatsinghpur, Jajpur, Kendrapara, Nayagarh, Khurda, Bhadrak, Nuapada, Angul and Sonepur were formed. Again in 1994 3 new districts namely Boudh, Jharsuguda and Deogarh were formed.,thus increasing the number of districts to 32. (32 Police districts against 30 Revenue districts) .

  • After enactment of the Orissa Military Police Act (Orissa Act VII of 1946) the Orissa Military Police was formed on 1 st March, 1946. Soon after its creation this force had to handle serious situations in places like Bhadrak, Ib, Barang, Rampur, Cuttack etc. Due to strenuous nature of work of the military police and need for more personnel its strength was increased w.e.f. 1 st March, 1947. The strenth was further increased with the formation of a Gurkha Military Police unit. On 1 st March 1948, after merger of feudatory States in the Province of Orissa,there was a re-organisation of the police organization and the 2 nd Battalion of Orissa Military police was established. This Battalion had both Gurkha and Oriya companies. While the Bn. Headquarters was at Dhenkanal, two detachment camps of this battalion were functioning at Nayagarh and Jharsuguda. Subsequently, other Battalions came up at different places of the State. At present, there are altogether 8 Battalions and one India Reserve Battalion.

The name “Orissa Military Police” remained in vogue till 1980 .consequent upon enactment of the Orissa Military Police (Amendment) Act 1980, the name “Orissa Military Police’’ was changed to “Special Armed Police”. The headquarters of the SAP is at state Police Hqrs, Cuttack and it is under the general control and direction of the Director General and Inspector General of Police.

4. Annual central grant known as “Modernisation grant “ was made available to all the states by the Centre from 1969-70 onwards. Under this scheme Orissa Police received funds to purchase wireless equipments, motor vehicles, scientific and technical equipments etc for modernization of the Orissa Police. A full-fledged forensic science laboratory was established at Bhubaneswar under the control of DIG, CID, providing serological, chemical and other expert- examination facilities within the state.

5. Home-guards organization, as an auxiliary force, was set up in Orissa in the year 1962. In 1973 the post of Deputy Commandant General, Home-guards and Fire Service was sanctioned. However, in 1978 the Fire service and Home guards organization was taken out of the control of Police organization and started functioning independently under the Commandant General, Home-guards and Inspector General, Fire Service under the Home Department. The status of the head of the department was up-graded to the rank of Director General in 1985.

6. Since its inception the Orissa Police has successfully handled major Law and Order situations and ensured safety of its citizen and security of public properties.. In the fourth decade of the twentieth century the colonial police tackled a number of law and order problems arising out of nationalist movements. After the independence in 1947, there was a lull as nationalist movements subsided. However, the state witnessed palpable tension during the visit of the State Re-organisation Committee in 1955. Recommendations of the State Re-organisation Committee generated tension and frustrations resulting in large-scale demonstrations and law and order situations in January, 1956. ‘Sima Andolon’ (Border agitation) in Sareikela and Kharasuan opposing its merger with Bihar spread in different parts of the state with large scale demonstrations taking place at a number of places. In the ensuing law and order situation there was a police firing at Puri in which 3 persons lost their lives. Establishment of Paradeep port in 1956, Hirakud Dam in 1960-61 and Tikarpada Dam in 1962-63 brought in its wake, law and order situations, on issues relating to resettlement of evacuees etc. Another landmark on the law and order scenario was a large-scale communal riot in and around Rourkela in 1964. An students’ agitation gripped the entire state during 1964. Another statewide students’ agitation shook the entire state in 1969. In 1980, a students’ agitation on some local issues started in Sambalpur, which subsequently turned into an agitation against a particular business community and spread in almost all the districts of western Orissa. In 1990, after declaration of acceptance of recommendations of the Mandal Commission by the Central Govt., agitations started in many parts of the country including Orissa. The agitation spread almost in the entire state and police had to use all the resources at its command to contain the same. Police had to resort to firing in Cuttack and use force, though of lesser magnitude, in many other places. In 1991 there was a serious communal riot at Bhadrak in which a number of lives were lost. The riot spread to Soro, another small town located nearby. However, the communal riots were firmly controlled in both the towns. Thereafter, no major law and order situation of state-wide dimension has been witnessed in the state.

7. In the 1980s, left wing extremism raised its hydrahead after a gap of about a decade in certain parts of southern districts of Orissa, namely, Koraput, and Ganjam. After the division of Koraput district into 4 districts viz:- Koraput, Rayagada, Malkanagiri and Nowrangpur district and division of Ganjam district into Ganjam and Gajapati districts, the left wing extremism was noticed taking an ascendance in the districts of Malkangiri, Rayagada, and Gajapati. In later part of 1990s the left wing extremism also spread to the districts of Mayurbhanj, Keonjhar and Sundargarh located in the Northern Orissa.

8. Orissa Police has kept pace with others in modernisation by procuring latest gadgets and arms and ammunition, in building up infrastructure and upgrading the skill of its personnel by providing latest training.

Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Modernisation of Orissa Police

Modernisation of ORISSA state police force

1. The Modernisation Scheme of Govt. of India intends to improve the efficiency of Police in all aspects of its functioning. The Modernisation Scheme has been introduced in Orissa State since the year 1969-70. The Central Assistance of the Scheme was limited to Rs.22 lakhs per year till 1978-79 (i.e. 10 years). The allocation was utilised for improving the following Components along with the equal Matching Share of State Government.

a. Communication facilities

b. New motor vehicles

c. Scientific Aids to investigation.

2. Govt. of India approved the revival of the Scheme for Modernisation of State Police Force as a Non-plan scheme for another period of 10 years from 1979-80 to 1989-90. The allocation was fixed to Rs.46.96 lakhs as Central Assistance every year. The following items were admissible under the Scheme.

a. Wireless Equipment : Capital expenditure On-Line communication including teleprinter service, wireless items for use in cities and each Police Station to be fitted with Wireless Set.

b. Mobility : Provision of Vehicles – It should be the endeavour to supply each Police Station with a Jeep.

c. Equipment for Training Institution.

d. Equipment for Forensic Science Laboratories and equipment for other Scientific Aids to Investigation.

e. Equipment for Finger Print Bureau.

f. Equipment for examination of questioned documents.

g. Construction of buildings for State, Forensic Science Laboratories up to a ceiling of 10 lakhs for each State.

h. Data Processing Machines for Crime Records, Statistics and accounts.

i. Matching Share – State Govt. must similar amount for expenditure on the Scheme from its own resources.

3. Thereafter, Govt. of India has approved the continuance of the scheme for a further period of 10 years w.e.f. the financial year, 1990-91 to 1999-2000. The annual allocation of Central Assistance earmarked for the State for the period from 1992-1993 was increased to Rs.1,04,61 lakhs per year. Govt. of India fixed the percentage as follows.

a. Police Training equipment/building : 20%

b. FSL equipment/building : 20%

c. Equipment for light weaponry, aids for Crowd : 20%

Control, Traffic Control, VVIP Security.

d. Mobility acquisition of New Vehicles : 20%

e. Communication : 10%

f. Equipment, aids to investigation, Data : 10%

processing, Office equipment.

4. From the year 1996-97, Govt. of India discontinued allocation towards Police Training and Communication as 10th Finance Commission recommended grants separately for these components.

5. In the year 2000-2001, Govt. of India have enhanced the annual allocation of Central Assistance from Rs.1,04,61,000/- to Rs.30.50 crores per annum for the period of 5 years i.e. 2000-2001 to 2004-2005. The following items are admissible under the Modernisation Scheme.

a. Mobility – procurement of new and replacement of old vehicles including Bullet proof, Mine proof as per requirement.

b. Weaponry.

c. Modern Communication System.

d. Training including expansion/renovation and enhancement of other infrastructural facilities for training.

e. FSL/FPB facilities.

f. Equipment/Aids to investigation including intelligence gathering arrangement.

g. Office equipment including computer.

h. Police Station/ OP Building including its security, facilities for Women Police and Housing facilities for lower and upper subordinate staff.

i. Night vision devices, Metal Detector, Bomb disposal equipment, Body Protector, Bullet Proof Vests and such other necessary protective equipment.

j. Modern Traffic Control equipment etc.

5.1. Accordingly 5 years perspective plan for the year 2000-2001, 2001-2002, 2002-2003, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 for Rs.30500.00 lakhs has been submitted to Govt. of India.

5.2. From the year 2003-2004 in terms of Revised Policy of Govt. of India to share the Modernisation Scheme on 60-40 basis between the Centre and State.

5.3. From the year 2005-06, Central Govt. increased its assistance to 75:25 basis.


HIGHLIGHTS OF PERSPECTIVE PLAN

FINANCIAL ACTION PLAN

(Rs. In lakhs)

Sl.

No.

Component

Projection of five year plan proposed in

Total Projection in 5 year.

2000-2001

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

1.

Arms

773.20

518.00

766.00

666.00

578.42

3301.62

2.

Equipment for Police

211.64

130.45

134.62

145.62

158.62

780.95

3.

Mobility

1113.00

1147.20

905.09

960.23

910.44

5035.96

4.

Communication

192.00

115.81

144.06

150.00

143.83

745.70

5.

Training equipment/ Library Books

10.25

7.68

2.00

2.70

4.50

27.13

6.

Computers

80.00

191.75

102.98

113.00

121.50

609.23

7.

Traffic Control Equipment

-

44.70

44.70

44.70

44.70

178.80

8.

Upgradation of State CID

-

25.58

33.60

22.49

16.86

98.53

9.

Revamping of Intelligence gathering arrangement

23.91

125.84

195.60

58.78

104.98

509.11

10.

Upgradation of FSL/ FPB/HWB/PB

-

294.50

211.10

173.25

177.65

856.50

11.

Buildings

a) Non-Res.

b) Residential

1826.00

1887.00

1909.29

1589.20

1837.05

1723.20

2016.23

1747.00

2263.10

1558.40

9851.67

8504.80

Grand Total

6117.00

6100.00

6100.00

6100.00

6083.00

30500.00

Summery of the Financial Allocation, Expenditure from

the year 2000-01 to 2005-06.

(Rs. in lakhs)

Year

Allocation

Expenditure as on 31.10.05

Balance

% of utilisation

Central Assistance

State share

Total

Central Assistance

State share

Total

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

2000-01

3058.50

3058.50

6117.00

3005.74

3000.54

6006.28

110.72

98.18%

2001-02

3050.00

3050.00

6100.00

3037.44

2663.89

5701.33

398.67

93.46%

2002-03

1619.24

1619.24

3238.66

1610.75

1536.49

3147.24

91.42

97.17%

2003-04

2200.00

1533.33

3733.33

2152.06

1327.24

3479.30

254.03

93.19%

2004-05

2623.98

1749.32

4373.30

2086.55

927.42

3013.97

1359.33

68.91%

Total

12551.72

11010.57

23562.29

11892.54

9455.58

21348.12

2214.17

90.60%

2005-06

2500.00

833.33

3333.33

-

-

-

3333.33

1. Rs.664.04 lakhs MHA has been requested to release funds directly to OFB.

2. Rs.250.00 lakhs will be release directly to DCPW.

3. Rs.750.00 lakhs released directly to the OPH&WC.

G.Total

15051.72

11843.90

26895.62


6. Year wise Allocation, Expenditure and details of items for the year 2000-2001 to 2004-2005.

6.1. 2000-2001.

In the year 2000-2001, Govt. of India has released Rs.3058.50 lakhs and accorded approval for expenditure of Rs.6117.00 lakhs including 50% as States Match Share. The break up is as follows.

(Rs. In lakhs)

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation

Expenditure

Details of items

1.

Arms

Rs.773.20

Rs.773.20

1. 1001 nos. 9 mm Pistol

2. 196 nos. 9 mm Carbine

3. 57 nos. 7.62 mm SLR

4. 110 nos. Magazine

5. 24 nos. 5.56 LMG

6. 2023 nos. 5.56 mm INSAS Rifle

7. 50 nos. 7.62 mm IAI Rifle

2.

Equipment for Police

Rs.211.64

Rs.206.01

1. 3 nos. Generators

2. 12 nos. Xerox Machine

3. 439 nos. Bullet Proof Jackets

4. 196 nos. Body Protector Sets

5. 3 nos. Binocular

6. 13 nos. Search Lights

7. 4 nos. Extension Search Mirror

8. 36 nos. Under Vehicle Search Mirror

9. one Mobile Crane

10. One Dial 100 Call Centre system

11. 14 nos. Video camera

3.

Mobility

Rs.1113.00

Rs.1112.82

1. 45 nos. Heavy Vehicle

2. 54 nos. Medium Vehicles

3. 61 nos. Light Vehicle

4. 2 nos. Bullet Proof Vehicles

5. 455 nos. Motor Cycles

6. 2 nos. AC for BP Jeep

4.

Communication

Rs.192.00

Rs.192.00

1. 10 nos. HF Sets

2. 250 nos. VHF sets

3. 322 nos. VHF sets Hand Held

4. 20 nos. VHF auto repeater set

5. 14 nos. four legged self supporter Tower Mast.

5.

Training equipment

Hospital Equipment

Library Books

Rs.10.25

Rs.10.25

1. 1 no. Xerox Machine

2. 1 no. AC machine

3. 1 no.Stabiliser

4. 1 no. LCD Projector

5. 3 nos. Computers with accessories

6. Hospital equipment

7. PT equipment

8. Library Books

9. one Dot matrix printer

6.

Computers

Rs.80.00

-

-

7.

Traffic Control Equipment

-

-

-

8.

Upgradation of State CID

-

-

-

9.

Security/Intelligence Equipment

Rs.23.91

Rs.22.90

1. 1 no. Bomb Basket

2. 1 no. Blasting Machine

3. 15 nos. Under Vehicle Search Mirror

4. 13 nos. Mine Sweeper/Deep Search

Metal Detector.

5. 15 no. Door Frame Metal Detector

6. 1 no. Prodder

7. 1 no. Tool Kit

8. 1 no. Extension Search Mirror

9. 1 no. Search Light

10. 1 no. Bomb Blanket

11. 3 nos. Sniffer Dogs

12. 1 no. Non-Liner Junction Detector

13. 1 no. Ice Tong

14. 1 no. RSP Tool Kit

15. 15 nos. Hand Held Metal Detector

16. 1 no. Water Cannon

17. 1 no. Fabrication of Bomb Truck

10.

Up-gradation of FSL/ FPB/PB/HWB

-

-

-

11.

Buildings

a) Non-Residential

Rs.1826.00

Rs.1813.89

1. 142 Rest room-cum- Toilet

2. 124 OP buildings

3. 34 PS buildings

4. 5 Class Room

5. 2 Common Latrine

6. 4 nos. 100 men Barrack

7. 1 Guest House

8. 2 Watch Tower

9. 2 Garrage

b) Residential

Rs.1887.00

Rs.1874.21

1. 260 nos. ‘E’ type quarters

2. 266 nos. ‘F’ type quarters

Total

Rs.6117.00

Rs.6006.28

The Action is under process for utilisation of the balance amount of Rs.110.72 lakhs very shortly.


6.2. 2001-2002

Govt. of India have released Rs.3050.00 lakhs and accorded their approval for expenditure of Rs.6100.00 lakhs including 50% as States Matching Share. The achievement as follows.

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation

Expenditure

Details of items

1.

Arms (Lethal & Non-lethal)

Rs.518.00

Rs.518.00

1. 571 nos. 9 mm Pistol

2. 1200 nos. 7.62 mm Rifle used and serviceable.

3. 114 nos. 9mm Carbine

4. 20 nos. 5.56 LMG

5. 10 nos. Chest

6. 10 nos. Muzzle Cover

7. 50 nos. Magazine

8. 272 nos. 12 Bore Pump Action Gun

9. 200 nos. AK-47 Rifles

10. 938 nos. 5.56mm Insas Rifle

2.

Equipment for Police

Rs.130.45

Rs.121.11

1.216 nos. Bullet Prof Jackets

2. 600 nos. Body Protector Set

3. 40 nos. Search Light

4. 5 nos. Xerox machine

5. 6 nos. Extension Search Mirror

6. 1 no. Printing Machine

7. 100 nos. Under Vehicle Search Mirror

8. 1 no. Wheeler for Plate Cutting

9. 1 no. Plate Grinding Machine

10. 1 no. Semi Automatic Paper Cutting machine

11. 4 nos. Binocular

12. 1 no. Training Simulator

13. 1 no. Single Colour fedoff Printing machine

14. Up-gradation of EPABX System at SPHdqrs.

15. 2 nos. Video camera

3.

Mobility

Rs.1157.20

Rs.1155.46

1. 24 nos. Heavy Vehicles

2. 60 nos. Medium Vehicles

3. 159 nos. Light Vehicle

4. 7 nos. Motor Cycles

5. One Mobile Crane

6. 2 nos. Bullet Proof Maruti Gypsy.

7. 2 nos. FSS van

4.

Communication

Rs.115.81

Rs.115.81

1. 24 nos. HF Transreceiver

2. 107 nos. VHF Trans receiver

3. 35 nos. VHF Trans Receiver Hand Held

4. 35 nos. VHF Trans Receiver

5. 107 nos. Trans Receiver Static Mobile

6. 50 nos. UHF Trans receiver

7. 30 nos. UHF Hand Held

8. 103 nos. Generator Sets

9. 5 nos. Oscilloscope

10. 6 nos. Frequency Counter

11. 20 nos. Digital Multi Meter

12. 2 nos. Solding and Desolding stations.

13. 5 nos. AM/FM Generator

5.

Training Equipment

Hospital Equipment

Library Books

Rs.7.68

Rs.6.65

1. 1 no. Laptop Computer

2. 1 no. Stereo Recorder-cum-Amplifier

3. 6 nos. Column speaker

4. 1 no. Microphone stand

5. 1 no. White Pana Board

6. 3 nos. Microphone

7. 1 no. LCD Projector

8. 1 no. 16 Station Multigym

9. 1 no. Exercise Cycle

10. 1 set Jogger Trade Mill

11. 1 no. Twister with folding stand

12. 626 nos. Library Books

6.

Computers

Rs.191.75

-

-

7.

Traffic Control Equip.

Rs.34.70

Rs.25.18

1. 10 nos. Breath Analyser

2. 20 nos. Megha Phone

3.500 nos. Retro Reflective Jacket

4.3 nos. Pollution measuring equipment

5. 150 nos. Safety Signal Baton

6. 4 nos. Traffic Radar

7. 5 nos. Inflatable Emergency Lighting system

8.

Upgradation of State CID

Rs.25.58

Rs.16.53

1. 1 no. Xerox Machine

2. 2 nos. Fax Machine

3. 1 no. LCD projector

4. 2 nos. CD writer

5. 11 nos. Dogs

6.19 nos. Bed Cots

7.19 nos. Feeding Tables

8.38 nos. Jumping Stand

9.19 nos. Choke Chain

10.19 nos. Leather Lasses

11. 1 no. Scanner

12. 5 nos. Laptop Computer

13. 9 nos. Dicta Phone

14.19 nos. Refrigerator

15. 38 nos. Gas Cylinder

16. 38 nos. LP Gas Refills

17. 19 nos. Pressure Regulator

18. 19 nos. Gas Stove

19. 2 nos. Desk Top Computer

20. 2 nos. UPS

21. 2 nos. Dot Matrix Printer

9.

Intelligence gathering arrangement

Rs.125.84

Rs.117.01

1. 30 nos. Deep Search Metal Detector

2. 1 no. Bomb Suit

3. 1 no. Explosive Detector

4. 66 nos. Bullet Proof Jackets

5. 10 nos. Paper Shreding Machine

6. 1 no. Digital video Camera

7.40 nos. stunner

8.1 no. X-ray Baggage Machine

9. 1 no. RSP Tool Kit

10. 1 no. Mini Cassette Recorder

11. 66 nos. Hand Held Metal Detector

12. 40 nos. Door Frame Metal Detector

13. 8 nos. Xerox Machine

14. 1 no. Explosive Ordnance disposal Shield

15. 1 no. Telescopic Manupulator

16.1 no. Still Camera with accessires

17. 10 nos. fire Extinguisher

18. 10 nos. Mobile Phone

19. 1 no. Mini Frequency Jammer

20. 1 no. wire & Cable and Locator

21. 1 no. Line and Hook set

22. 1 no. Diesel Generator

23. 2 nos. Laptop Computer

10.

Upgradation of FSL/ FPB/ PB/ HWB

(A) FSL equipment

Rs.132.00

Rs.132.00

1. 2 nos. solvent extraction system

2. 2 nos. Leica CFM

3. 1 no. GCMS Photo Meter

4. 1 no. HPL system

5. 6 nos. Computer

6. 4 nos. Dot Matrix Printer

7. 2 nos. Laser Printer

8. 6 nos. UPS

9. 4 nos. D-Link External Modern 56 KBPS

(B) FPB equipment

Rs.156.00

-

-

(C) Photo equipment

Rs.6.50

Rs.6.50

1 no. Auto colour film and Paper Processor.

1 no. auto colour Enlarger

(D) HWB equipment

-

-

-

11.

Buildings

a) Non-Residential

Rs.1909.29

Rs.1906.59

1. 20 PS Building

2. 29 OP buildings

3. SPA building at Ranasinghpur

4. 6 nos. Watch Tower

5. 1 no. ISB Office

6. 1 no.Gymnacium Hall

7.2 nos. DFSL building

8. 10 nos. Reserve Office Buildings

9. 6 nos. 40 Men Barrack

10. 27 nos. Boundary Wall

11. 1 no. Canine Breeding Centre

12. 2 nos. RFSL building

13. 1 no. Training Hall and Hostel

14. 1 no. SFSL building extension with DNA Laboratory.

15. 3 nos. 100 men barrack.

16. 1 no. 30 men barrack.

b) Residential

Rs.1589.20

Rs.1580.49

1. 1 no ‘B’ type Qrs.

2. 186 nos. ‘E’ type Qrs.

3. 278 nos. ‘F’ type Qrs.

Total

Rs.6100.00

Rs.5701.33

Efforts are on to spend/utilise the balance amount of Rs.398.67 lakhs very shortly.


6.3. 2002-2003

Govt. of India have released Rs.1619.24 lakhs and accorded their approval for expenditure of Rs.5994.98 lakhs including 50% as State’s Matching share. The expenditure has been incurred for Rs.3238.66 lakhs. The achievement is as follows :

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation

Expenditure

Details of items

1.

Arms (Lethal & Non-lethal)

Rs.754.00

Rs.754.00

1. 1336 nos. 7.62 mm SLR

2. 1125 nos. Magazine

3. 500 nos. 5.56 mm Insas Rifle

4. 22 nos. 5.56 mm INSAS LMG

5. 22 nos. 51mm mortar

6. 1014 nos. 12 Bore Pump Action Gun.

7. 8 nos. Chest.

8. 100 nos. 9mm Carbine

9. 120 nosl Machine Pistol

10. 5 nos. Pistol Auto 9 mm

2.

Equipment for Police

Rs.148.62

Rs.131.41

1. 10 nos. Deep Search Mine detector kit with accessories.

2. 6 nos. Commando Light.

3. 244 nos. Bullet Proof Jackets

4. 40 nos. Search Light

5. 8 nos. Extension Search Mirror

6. 30 nos. Binocular

7. 400 nos. Poly Carbonet Shield

8. 1 no. Concrete Iron Cutter

9. 2 nos. Chain Shaw Wood Cutter

10. 18 nos. Life Jacket

11. 3 nos. Inflatable Rubber Boat

12. 6 nos. Life Bouy

13. 400 nos. Riot Control Helmet

14. 400 nos. Rubberised Baton Lathi

15. 11 nos. Fax Machine

16. 2 Set Laset Printer

17. 1 Set HP Inkjet Colour Printer

18. 1 Set HP Colour Printer

19. 1 Set High Speed Laser Printer

20. 60 nos. Under Vehicle Search Mirror

21. 40 nos. Hand held metal detector

22. 40 nos. GS Pal tent

23. 1 no. Fibre Glass Boat

24. 20 nos. Door frame metal detector

25. 1 set Generator

26. 1 no. Portable tent

27. 1 no Hydrolic Jack

28. 1133 kg Nylon & Plastic rope

29. 5 nos. Laptop Computer

30. 10 nos. Night Vision Binocular

31. 1 no. 10 Line Intercom System

32. 3 nos. Digital Video Camera

33. 2 nos. AC machine with stabilizer

3.

Mobility

Rs.916.59

Rs.911.57

1. 74 nos. Jeep

2. 10 Bolero

3. 6 Qualis

4. 4 Ambassador Car

5. 4 Ambulance

6. 10 nos. Maruti Gypsy

7. 2 nos. Riot Control Vehicle

8. 18 nos. Heavy Vehicles

9. 46 nos. Medium Vehicles

10. 1 no. Accident Recovery Van

4.

Communication

Rs.119.07

Rs.118.95

1. 187 nos. VHF sets

2. 1 no. AF Signal Generator

3. 27 nos. HF sets

4. 70 nos. UHF sets.

5. 77 nos. Portable Generator

6. 2 nos. UHF Auto Repeater

7. 3 nos. AC Milli Volt Meter

8. 3 nos. AF Output Meter

9. 1 no. Madulator Meter

10. 1 no. RF Output Meter

11. 2 nos. 15 KVA Diesel Generator

12. 2 nos. Fabricated Base Frame

13. 2 nos. Diesel Engine DA.20

14. 1 no. Distoration Factor meter

15. 5 nos. Data Terminal Equipment

16. 5 nos. HF/VHF Radio model

17. 7 nos. 650 VA Offline UPS

18. 3 nos. Regulated power supply unit

19. 1 no. RF Milli Volt Meter

20. 1 no. LCRO meter

21. 1 no. IC tester

5.

Training Equipment

Rs.2.00

Rs.1.88

1. 3 nos. over head projector

2. 1 no. slide projector

3. 4 nos. AC machine

6.

Computer

-

-

-

7.

Traffic Control Equip.

-

-

-

8.

Upgradation of State CID

Rs.22.56

Rs.22.25

1. 1 no. photo copier

2. 1 no.multi channel telephone recorder

3. 1 no. Dot matrix printer

4. 1 no. Laser printer

5. 3 nos. computer

6. 3 nos. UPS

7. 2 nos. Laptop computer

8. 1 no. Fax machine

9. 1 no. Voice Analyser

9.

Intelligence gathering arrangement

Rs.200.20

Rs.194.10

1. 2 nos. Laptop computer

2. 2 nos. storage cabinet

3. one letter bomb detector

4. 2 nos. radio operative wire cutter

5. 8 nos. Non-Liner Junction Detector

6. 21 nos. Hand Held Metal Detector

7. 7 nos. Prodder

8. 10 nos. Mobile Phone

9. 8 nos. Took Kit

10. 2 nos. Photo Copier

11. 4 nos. Door Frame Metal Detector

12. Storage System equipment for BDDS

13. 1 no. Optical Fiberscope with accessories.

14. 6 nos. Real time Viewing System

15. 2 nos. Bomb Blankets

16. 1 no. X-Ray Baggage Machine

17. High Explosive with accessories

18. 9 nos. Explosive detection Kit.

19. 10 nos. Palm Held Metal Detector

20. 1 no. Under Vehicle Search Mirror

21. 6 nos. Digital Voice Recorder

22. 1 no. Car remote opening tool kit

23. 1 no. still camera

24. 2 nos. Fax machine-cum-scanner

25. 1 no. Drilling machine

26. 1 no. Explosive Ordnance disposal shield.

27. 2 nos. AC Machine with Stabilizer

28. 20 nos. Fax machine

29. 1 no. Digital Video Camera

10.

Upgradation of FSL/ FPB/PB/HWB

(A) FSL equipment

Rs.1.27

Rs.1.27

1. 1 no. Digital Photo Copier

(B) FPB equipment

Rs.63.00

Rs.2.89

1. 1 no. Digital Xerox Machine

(C) Photo equipment

Rs.40.50

Rs.38.07

1. 1 no. Digital multi lab

2. 2 no. digital still camera

3. 1 no. computer

4. 1 no. Laser Printer

5. 2 nos. AC Machine with Stabilizer

6. 1 no. Video Camera

8. 2 nos. UPS

9. 2 nos. 5 KVA Stabilizer

10. 3 nos. Mobile Phone with Camera

(D) HWB equipment

-

-

-

11.

Buildings

a) Non-Residential

Rs.208.95

Rs.208.05

1. 1 office building of State CB

2. 5 nos. Restroom-cum-Toilets

3. 4 nos. Common Latrine

4. 3 nos. Garage

5. 1 no. Digital Imaging Laboratory.

6. 10 nos. Out Post Buildings.

b) Residential

Rs.762.80

Rs.762.80

1. 2 nos. ‘B’ type Qrs.

2. 24 nos. ‘E’ type Qrs.

3. 252 ‘F’ type Qrs.

Total

Rs.3238.66

Rs.3147.24

Efforts are on to spend/utilise the balance amount of Rs.91.42 lakhs shortly.


6.4. 2003-2004

Govt. of India have released Rs.2200.00 lakhs and accorded their approval for expenditure of Rs.5942.58 lakhs including 40% as State’s Matching Share. The expenditure has been incurred for Rs.3733.33 lakhs. The achievement is as follows:-

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation

Expenditure

Details of items

1.

Arms (Lethal & Non-lethal)

Rs.657.72

Rs.657.72

1. 1349 nos. 5.56mm Insas Rifle

2. 864 nos. 7.62mm Rifle with magazine

3. 7 nos. Sniper Rifle

4. 7 nos. Day Vision Binocular

5. 3 nos. Night Vision Telescope

6. 60 nos. Machine Pistol with Magazine

2.

Equipment for Police

Rs.79.00

Rs.25.57

1. 15 nos. Photo Copier

2. 10 nos. Global Positioning System

3. 1 no. Scanner

4. 2 nos. Desk Top Computer

5. 20 nos. Search Light

6. 50 nos. Under vehicle Search Mirror

7. 4 nos. Prodder

8. 8 nos.

9. 10 nos. Fax machine

10. 310 nos. Body Protector Set

3.

Mobility

Rs.967.57

Rs.917.58

1. 100 nos. Light Vehicle

2. Heavy vehicle-18

3. Medium vehicle-36

4. 2 nos. Riot Control Vehicles

5. 4 nos. BP Ambassador Car

4.

Communication

Rs.82.87

Rs.77.66

1. 30 nos. HF Transreceiver

2. 460 nos. VHF Transreceiver

5.

Training Equipment

Rs.2.70

Rs.1.29

1. 3 nos. Audio Recording Systems

2. 1 no. Digital Video Camera

6.

Computer

-

-

-

7.

Traffic Control Equip.

-

-

-

8.

Upgradation of State CID

Rs.14.47

Rs.6.27

1. 1 no. Photo Copier Machine

2. 7 nos. Computer Systems

3. 3 nos. Investigation Kit

4. 216 nos. Library Books

9.

Intelligence gathering arrangement

Rs.99.11

Rs.99.11

1 no. Vehicle mounted jammer

10.

Upgradation of FSL/ FPB/PB/HWB

(A) FSL equipment

-

-

-

(B) FPB equipment

-

-

-

(C) Photo equipment

Rs.10.75

Rs.4.16

1. 1 no. Digital Video Camera

2. 1 no. Digital Still Camera

3. 1 no. Laptop Computer

(D) HWB equipment

-

-

-

11.

POLNET Scheme

Rs.85.25

Rs.85.25

Govt. of India placed fund directly to DCPW.

11.

Buildings

a) Non-Residential

Rs.1662.50

Rs.1604.69

1. 4 nos. 100 Men barrack

2. 12 nos. Police Station Buildings

3. 20 nos. Fortification of Police Station

4. Part of SIW building

5. 4 nos. District Armoury

6. 1 no. Battalion Armoury

7. 3 nos. OP Building

8. 2nd Phase State CB Building

9. Gents’ Hostel & Auditorium at SPA

10. Fortification of

(i) 7 nos. District Armoury

(ii) 6 nos. Battalion Armoury

(iii) 1 no. Police Station.

b) Residential

Rs.71.39

-

-

Total

Rs.3733.33

Rs.3479.30

The action is under process for utilisation of the balance amount of Rs.254.03 lakhs very shortly.


6.5. 2004-2005

Govt. of India have released Rs.2623.98 lakhs and accorded their approval for expenditure of Rs.6099.24 lakhs including 40% as State’s Matching Share. The expenditure has been incurred for Rs.4373.30 lakhs. The achievement is as follows:-

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation

Expenditure

Details of items

1.

Arms & Weapons

Rs.378.51

Rs.361.95

1. 10 nos. Galil 7.62 Sniper Rifle

2. 10 nos. Day vision Telescope

3. 5 nos. Night Vision Telescope

4. 20 nos. 5.56mm LMG

5. 5 nos. Rocket Launcher

6. 40 nos. Tear Gas Gun

7. 100 nos. 9mm Carbine

8. 200 nos. 12 Bore Pump Action Gun

9. 875 nos. 5.56 Insas Rifle

2.

Equipment for Police

Rs.158.22

Rs.33.06

1. 4 nos. Extension Search Mirror

2. 10 nos. Fax machine

3. 205 nos. Rubberised Batton lathi

4. 205 nos. Riot Control Helmet

5. 205 nos. Poly Carbonate Shield

6. 5 nos. Photo Copier

7. 1 no. Laptop computer

8. 24 nos. Franking machine

9. 205 nos. Body Protector Set

3.

Mobility

Rs.522.56

Rs.348.66

1. 12 nos. Medium vehicle

2. 48 nos. Light vehicle

3. 2 nos. Indica Diesel Car

4. 16 nos. Motor Cycle

5. 14 nos. Heavy vehicle

4.

Communication

Rs.143.84

Rs.7.27

1. 24 nos. AC machine

2. 24 nos. Stabilizer

5.

Training Resources

-

-

6.

Computers

Rs.138.19

-

7.

Traffic Control Equipment

Rs.19.90

-

8.

Upgradation of CID

Rs.16.86

-

9.

Intelligence gathering arrangement

Rs.104.98

Rs.34.44

1. 10 nos. Hand held Metal Detector

2. 96 nos. Door frame Metal Detector

3. 40 nos. Dragon Search Light

4. 30 nos. Prodder Metallic

5. 6 nos. Global positioning system

6. 1 no. Optical Fiberscope

7. 20 nos. Mobile Phone

8. 5 nos. Computer

9. 5 nos. Mobile Phone

10.

FSL Equipment

Rs.44.50

-

11.

FPB Equipment

114.00

-

12.

HWB Equipment

Rs.7.00

-

13.

PB Equipment

Rs.4.65

-

14.

Building

Non Residential

Rs.2081.00

Rs.1631.35

1. 2 nos. RFSL building (2nd phase)

2. 21 nos. Police Station building

3. 3 nos. 100 seated barrack

4. 2 nos.60 seated barrack

5. 9 nos. Reserve Office

6. 14 nos. Fortification of PS

7. Part construction of SIW building

Residential

Rs.536.95

Rs.495.10

1. 58 nos. ‘E’ type quarters

2. 63 nos. ‘F’ type quarters

15

POLNET

Rs.102.14

Rs.102.14

GOI placed the funds directly to DCPW

TOTAL

Rs.4373.30

Rs.3013.97

The action is under process for utilisation of the balance amount of Rs.1359.33 lakhs.

6.6. 2005-2006

During the current financial year 2005-06, the size of the Annual action plan is Rs.26.66 crores. Govt. of India were requested for release of Rs.20.00 crores as Central Assistance directly to the implementing agencies vide Home Deptt. letter No.45176 dt.28.9.05. Accordingly, the state will provide matching contribution of Rs.6.66 crores on 75:25 basis. However, Govt. of India vide letter No.VI-21011/46/2005-PM-I dt.30.9.05 and 14.11.05 have released Rs.19.00 crores (i.e. Rs.7.50 crores to OPH&WC and Rs.11.50 crores to the State Govt.) indicating that the Central allocation for the year 2005-06 will be in Rs.25.00 crores. Accordingly, reprioritisation Annual action plan amounting to Rs.33.33 crores including State’s share Rs.33 crores is under finalisation on the following component.

2005-06

Sl.

No.

Component

Central Assistance

State’s share

Total

1.

Arms

Rs.4,50,00,000/-

-

Rs.4,50,00,000/-

2.

Equipment for police

-

Rs.34,69,000/-

Rs.34,69,000/-

3.

Mobility

Rs.3,05,00,000/-

Rs.94,50,000/-

Rs.3,99,50,000/-

4.

Communication (Including POLNET)

Rs.2,50,00,000/-

Rs.24,06,978/-

Rs.2,74,06,978/-

5.

Training Resources

-

Rs.43,53,000/-

Rs.43,53,000/-

6.

CID Equipment

-

Rs.6,20,000/-

Rs.6,20,000/-

7.

Security/ Intelligence

-

Rs.34,00,000/-

Rs.34,00,000/-

8.

SFSL Equipment

-

Rs.7,98,000/-

Rs.7,98,000/-

9.

Non-Residential building

Rs.14,95,00,000/-

Rs.1,79,96,355/-

Rs.16,74,96,355/-

10.

Residential building

-

Rs.4,08,40,000/-

Rs.4,08,40,000/-

Total

Rs.25,00,00,000/-

Rs.8,33,33,333/-

Rs.33,33,33,333/-

The expenditure of the said amounts during the current financial year 2005-06 is being pursued vigorously.


7. Submission of Utilisation Certificate

Out of allocation of Rs.23562.29 lakhs for the year 2000-01 to 2004-05.

UC for Rs.21348.12 lakhs as on 31.10.2005 has been submitted to Home Department on 17.11.2005. Further during the period from 1.2.05 to 28.2.05 an amount of Rs.2214.17 lakhs (Rs.110.72 lakhs for 2000-01, Rs.398.67 lakhs for 2001-02 and Rs.91.42 lakhs for 2002-03, Rs.254.03 lakhs for 2003-2004 and Rs.1359.33 lakhs for 2004-05). Percentage of utilisation as on 31.10.2005 comes to 91%. Percentage of Utilisation is increasing year after year.

6. DIFFICULTIES IN UTILISATION OF FUND UNDER MODERNISATION SCHEME

6.1. Delay in approval of Action Plan by Govt. of India and release of Central Assistance.

6.2. Import of Equipments takes time.

6.3. Constitution of building projects takes time.


ANNEXURE –

MODERNISATION OF STATE POLICE FORCE

TOTAL EXPENDITURE (2000-2001 TO 2003-2004)

Sl.

No.

Component

Allocation 2000-2001 to 2002-2003

Amount released and utilised

% of utilisation

Balance 2000-2001 to 2002-2003

Allocation 2003-2004

Total balance 2000-2001 to 2003-2004

1.

Arms

20,45,20,000/-

7,63,77,122/-

37.34

12,81,42,878/-

6,66,00,000/-

19,47,42,878/-

2.

Equipments

4,90,70,500/-

3,07,24,216/-

62.61

1,83,46,284/-

1,49,62,000/-

3,33,08,284/-

3.

Mobility

31,86,79,000/-

25,81,39,349/-

81.00

6,05,39,651/-

9,80,23,000/-

15,85,62,651/-

4.

Communication

4,26,87,640/-

2,96,57,639/-

69.48

1,30,30,001/-

1,32,00,000/-

2,62,30,001/-

5.

Training Equipments

19,93,000/-

17,05,632/-

85.58

2,87,368/-

2,70,000/-

5,57,368/-

6.

Computer

2,71,75,000/-

NIL

0

2,71,75,000/-

1,31,00,000/-

4,02,75,000/-

7.

Traffic Control Equipments

34,70,000/-

5,84,300/-

16.84

28,85,700/-

20,70,000/-

49,55,700/-

8.

Up-gradation of State CID

48,14,121/-

26,63,382/-

55.32

21,50,739/-

17,49,000/-

38,99,739/-

9.

Security/ Intelligence Equipment

3,49,95,500/-

1,21,98,281/-

34.86

2,27,97,219/-

1,08,78,000/-

3,36,75,219/-

10.

Up-gradation of FSL/FPB/HW/PB

a. Forensic Science Laboratory

1,33,27,000/-

1,32,75,437/-

99.61

51,563/-

36,00,000/-

36,51,563/-

b. Finger Print Bureau

2,19,00,000/-

NIL

0

2,19,00,000/-

71,00,000/-

2,90,00,000/-

c. Hand Writing Bureau

-

-

10,50,000/-

10,50,000/-

d. Photo Bureau

47,00,000/-

37,18,327/-

79.11

9,81,673/-

10,75,000/-

20,56,673/-

11.

Buildings

a. Non-Residential

39,43,34,000/-

32,88,46,608/-

83.39

6,54,87,392/-

20,16,23,000/-

26,71,10,392/-

b. Residential

42,39,00,000/-

39,95,37,700/-

94.25

2,43,62,300/-

17,47,00,000/-

19,90,62,300/-

Grand Total

154,55,65,761/-

115,74,27,993/-

74.88

38,81,37,768/-

61,00,00,000/-

99,81,37,768/-

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